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Notification Law — When Neighbors Spray

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If you are trying to protect yourself or your family from pesticides, it can be very frustrating when neighbors hire ChemLawn (ironically named TruGreen now), Green Drop, Green T, Scotts, or one of many different lawn chemical applicators. But you can at least get enough notification to close your windows, bring in your laundry, and keep your children and pets inside for the day.
Here is the protection offered homeowners:
(d) Prior notification of application to lawn. In the case of all lawns other than golf courses:
(1) Any neighbor whose property abuts or is adjacent to the property of a customer of an applicator for hire may receive prior notification of an application by contacting the applicator for hire and providing his name, address and telephone number.
(2) At least the day before a scheduled application, an applicator for hire shall provide notification to a person who has requested notification pursuant to paragraph (1) of this subsection (d), such notification to be made in writing, in person or by telephone, disclosing the date and approximate time of day of application.
(3) In the event that an applicator for hire is unable to provide prior notification to a neighbor whose property abuts or is adjacent to the property because of the absence or inaccessibility of the individual, at the time of application to a customer’s lawn, the applicator for hire shall leave a written notice at the residence of the person requesting notification, which shall provide the information specified in paragraph (2) of this subsection (d).
If your neighbors apply chemicals themselves, I encourage you to have a conversation with them and ask them to notify you if they intend to apply chemicals. Share information. They may never have thought about the health effects and may benefit from your resources. After all, who would think such a commonly available product could be lethal, both in the long and short term?
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